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OAAA E-Weekly Newsletter

The Office of African-American Affairs  Newsletter Highlighting Events and Opportunities for OAAA Students

"Young, Gifted & Black:

40 Years of Preparing Students for the Quest"

Special Announcement

In order to reduce the risk of exceeding the max capacity, the Office has created an email for you to send print requests. Click here to get more details about printing.

Also, to maintain social distancing and safety guidelines while still supporting you, OAAA will only be able to host a very limited number of persons by appointment only. Students will be able to reserve study space for 60 minutes each day.  Click here to get more details and to make a reservation for study space.

Since we are all returning to Grounds, you may call our main number (434-924-7923), If you cannot reach us via phone please contact Mr. Smith (jcs9cz@virginia.edu) or Ms. Comfort (alc9r@virginia.edu) to assist you.

Let us continue to work together, staying focused and hopeful along the way and in ways that would enable us to do our best work in the midst of crises. We look forward to working with you this semester.

Sincerely, 

The Office of African-American Affairs

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UVA COVID-19 PREVENTION, DETECTION, AND RESPONSE PLAN

The University is closely monitoring key metrics and has developed a COVID-19 dashboard that will be shared and will track key metrics like the rate of infections and our operational readiness to respond to the virus. We stand ready to alter our operations and plans based on these metrics. We are grateful to all members of our community for their diligence in following the guidelines outlined below. A printable copy of the UVA COVID-19 Prevention, Detection, and Response Plan is available.


MARK YOUR CALENDAR

FALL 2020

No Fall Break                                     

Family Weekend will be
cancelled for 2020

 

Monday, November 4 - Friday, December 13
Apply for May 2021 Graduation

Friday, November 13 
Last Day to Withdraw from the University and Return for Spring 2021

Tuesday, November 24   
Courses end
(No in-person instruction or assessments after November 24)

Wednesday, December 2 - Friday, December 11   
Examinations (administered on-line only)         

Monday, December 14 
Undergraduate Enrollment for Spring 2021

To Be Determined
Fall degrees conferred

 

 

 

Quote of the Week

“Waking up in TRUTH is so much better than living in a lie” – Idris Elba

Kristen Graves

Spotlight on Student Achievements

Kristen Graves is a fourth-year from Newport News, VA, studying Government and History in the College of Arts and Sciences. In addition to her studies, Kristen participates in various organizations and movements to better her community and the University. As a University Guide Service member and student advisor to the President’s Commission, she seeks to uncover and examine the untold stories of UVA’s past. She serves as a mentor to Black and Brown students through the Office of African-American Affairs’ Peer Advisor Program, while also assisting students in pursuing legal careers through the Undergraduate Black Law Students Association. After receiving her degree, she plans to have a law and public policy career focusing on civil rights issues and healthcare. Graves is committed to constructing a better society, as she both values and aspires to work toward justice, equality, and equity.

Quote's Corner

Idrissa Akuna Elba was born September 6, 1972, and raised in London, England. He is an English actor, writer, producer, rapper, singer, songwriter, and DJ. His mother, Eve, is from Ghana and had clerical duty; his father, Winston, is from Sierra Leonne and worked at Ford Dagenham. Elba attended a school in Canning Town, where he first became involved in acting. After dropping out in 1988, he received a place in the National Youth Music Theatre. To support himself between acting roles he did odd jobs such as: tire fitting, cold call advertising sales, and worked night shift at the Ford Dagenham. Additionally, at the age of 19, Elba worked in nightclubs under the alias DJ Big Driis. However, he didn’t start auditioning for television roles until his early twenties. Elba is known for roles including Stringer Bell in the HBO series The Wire, DCI John Luther in the BBC One series Luther, and Nelson Mandela in the biographical film Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom (2013). He has been nominated four times for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Miniseries or Television Film, winning one, and was nominated five times for a Primetime Emmy Award. He also starred in Pacific Rim (2013), Beasts of No Nation (2015), for which he received BAFTA and Golden Globe nominations for Best Supporting Actor. Elba made his directorial debut in 2018 with an adaptation of the 1992 novel Yardie by Victor Headley. In October 2014, Elba presented the series Journey Dot Africa with Idris Elba on BBC Radio 2, exploring all types of African music. In 2015, he was named one of GQ magazine's 50 best-dressed British men. Elba was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in the 2016 New Year Honors for services to drama. In 2016, he was named in the Time 100 list of the Most Influential People in the World. As of May 2019, his films have grossed over $9.8 billion at the global box office, including over $3.6 billion in North America, where he is one of the top 20 highest-grossing actors.

Opportunites with Deadlines

The Cooke Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship is a highly selective scholarship for the nation’s top community college students seeking to complete their bachelor’s degrees at four-year colleges or universities. Each Cooke Scholar has access to generous financial support for two to three years, college planning support, ongoing advising, and the opportunity to connect with the thriving community of fellow scholars.

Each award is intended to cover a significant share of the student’s educational expenses – including tuition, living expenses, books and required fees – for the final two to three years necessary to achieve a bachelor’s degree. Awards vary by individual, based on the cost of tuition as well as other grants or scholarships they may receive. This highly competitive scholarship includes:

Up to $40,000 per year to attend a four-year accredited undergraduate school.
Ability to pursue any area of study.
Personal advising about selecting a college and navigating financial aid.
Multifaceted advising about how to transition to a four-year college and maximize the student experience.

 

The application closes on January 6, 2021 at 11:59 pm in your local time zone.

More information:

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The Rangel Program is a U.S. State Department program administered by Howard University that seeks to attract and prepare outstanding young people for careers as diplomats in the Foreign Service of the U.S. Department of State. The program seeks individuals interested in helping to shape a freer, more secure and prosperous world through formulating, representing, and implementing U.S. foreign policy. The Program encourages the application of members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service, women, and those with financial need.

More information can be found  at www.rangelprogram.org

This Week in Black History

Did you know that?  Around 1880, Nannie Helen Burroughs was born to a formerly enslaved couple living in Orange, Virginia. Her father died when she was young, and she and her mother relocated to Washington, DC. Burroughs excelled in school and graduated with honors from M Street High School (now Paul Laurence Dunbar High School). Despite her academic achievements, Burroughs was turned down for a Washington D.C. public school teaching position. Some historians speculate that the elite black community discriminated against Burroughs because she had darker skin. Undeterred, Burroughs decided to open her own school to educate and train poor, working African American women.  Burroughs proposed her school initiative to the National Baptist Convention (NBC). In response, the organization purchased six acres of land in Northeast Washington, D.C. Now Burroughs needed money to construct the school. She did not, however, have unanimous support. Civil rights leader Booker T. Washington did not believe African Americans would donate money to found the school. But Burroughs did not want to rely on money from wealthy white donors. Relying on small donations from black women and children from the community, Burroughs managed to raise enough money to open the National Training School for Women and Girls. Even though some people disagreed with teaching women skills other than domestic work, the school was popular in the first half of the 20th century. The school originally operated out of a small farm house. In 1928, a larger building named Trades Hall was constructed. The hall housed twelve classrooms, three offices, an assembly area and a print shop. In addition to founding the National Training School for Women and Girls, Burroughs also advocated for greater civil rights for African Americans and women. At the time, black women had few career choices. Many did domestic work like cooking and cleaning. Burroughs believed women should have the opportunity to receive an education and job training. She wrote about the need for black and white women to work together to achieve the right to vote. She believed suffrage for African American women was crucial to protect their interests in an often discriminatory society. Burroughs died in May 1961. She never married and she devoted her life to the education of black women. In 1964, the school was renamed the Nannie Helen Burroughs School in her honor. Burroughs defied societal restrictions placed on her gender and race and her work foreshadowed the main principles of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and 1970s. The Trades Hall, now a National Historic Landmark, is the last physical legacy of her lifelong pursuit for worldwide racial and gender equality.

Nannie Helen Burroughs holds a banner reading, "Banner State Woman's National Baptist Convention" as she stands with other African American women, photographed between 1905 and 1915

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OAAA Announcements & Services

OAAA Announcements & Services – Fall 2020

OAAA Virtual Office Hours

Monday with Dean Bassett
9:00 am – 10:30 am

Zoom Meeting - Passcode: 104941

Tuesday with Dean Bassett
11:30 am – 1:00 pm

Zoom Meeting - Passcode: 864290

Wednesday with Dean Thomas
11:30 am – 1:00 pm

Zoom Meeting - Passcode: 692599

Thursday with Dean Mason
11:30 – 1:00 pm

Zoom Meeting - Passcode: 605279

Friday with Mason/Thomas (Alternating)
9:30 am – 11:00 am

Zoom Meeting - Passcode: 474974

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OAAA Tutoring for Fall 2020 –

OAAA Tutoring for Fall 2020 –

OAAA Organic Chemistry Tutoring with Sarah Weisflog
Every Monday - 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm –  Zoom Room

OAAA Chemistry Tutoring with Yvette Gamor
Every Tuesday – 5:00 pm–7:00 pm – Zoom Room

OAAA Biology Tutoring with Jermaine Austin
Every Thursday – 3:00 pm–5:00 pm – Zoom Room

OAAA Calculus I and Statistics Tutoring with Travis Elliott 
Every Monday - 12:00 pm – 2:30 pm – Zoom Room

Every Thursday - 2:30 pm – 5:00 pm – Zoom Room

Contact: Dean Thomas for more information

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Contact: Dean Mason for more information on:

  • Black College Women (BCW) Book Club
  • Black Male Initiative (BMI)
  • Black President’s Council (BPC)
  • Black College Women (BCW) - In the Company of my Sister

Upcoming Events

*ONLINE* Yenching Academy Information Session
Monday, November 2 - 4:00 pm-5:00 pm - Zoom

The Yenching Academy of Peking University is a fully-funded residential program offering an array of interdisciplinary courses as part of a one-year master’s program in China Studies. Students from all fields are encouraged to apply and take advantage of one of six academic concentrations. Register here

*ONLINE* Boren Awards Information Session
Monday, November 9 - 4:00 pm-5:00 pm - Zoom

Interested in studying abroad? Learning a language crucial to US national security? Come learn about the Boren Awards, which fund the study of less commonly taught languages in world regions critical to U.S. interests, and underrepresented in study abroad, including Africa, Asia, Central and Eastern Europe, Eurasia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Come learn about the opportunity and the internal process for applying. Register here 

*ONLINE* Davis Projects for Peace Information Session
Monday, November 16 - 4:00 pm-5:00 pm - Zoom

The purpose of the Davis Projects for Peace is to spark initiatives for building prospects for peace in the world. Each year, the University of Virginia nominates one project and an alternate for the $10,000 prizes to actually complete the project. Come explore how your vision for peace could be funded by Davis. Register here:

The Office of Citizen Scholar Development
*ONLINE* Intro to Office and Q&A
Monday, November 23
- 4:00 pm-5:00 pm - Zoom

Haven't heard of the Office of Citizen Scholar Development? Don't know what fellowships are? Come listen to a brief introduction of the office followed by a time for Q&A. This session is helpful for students and alumni who have yet to interact with the Office of Citizen Scholar Development. Register here

*ONLINE* UK Fellows Information Session
Monday, November 30
- 4:00 pm-5:00 pm - Zoom

The United Kingdom Fellows Program allows graduating University of Virginia students the opportunity to teach and live abroad in a boarding school in the UK for the year following graduation. Come learn about the different schools with which we have a relationship and how to apply. Students in all fields welcome! Register here

Around the Charlottesville Area Community
Charlottesville Community Cares – Emergency Funding for Households
Apply Mondays thru Fridays between 9:00 am-5:00 pm by calling (434) 234-4490

If you are having economic hardship due to the COVID-19 virus, and live in the City of Charlottesville or Albemarle, Buckingham, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Nelson, or Orange Counties, call today. Multiple languages are available. Thanks to the Charlottesville Area Community Foundation, Cville Community Cares, United Way of Greater Charlottesville, City of Charlottesville, and the County of Albemarle for sponsoring this effort to support our community!

Filing for Unemployment [Video] – Virginia Employment Commission
Visit for help to file in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

“In My Humble Opinion”– 101.3 Jamz -- Charlottesville’s Own Talk/Radio
Every Sunday 12 noon – 3:00 pm

Hosted by Charles Lewis, Max, and Razor, along with special guests. Listen online at 101jamz.com, or download the free TuneIn app for iPhone and Android to get the latest local news in Charlottesville’s Black community.