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OAAA E-Weekly Newsletter

The Office of African-American Affairs  Newsletter Highlighting Events and Opportunities for OAAA Students

"Young, Gifted & Black:

40 Years of Preparing Students for the Quest"

Special Announcement

OAAA E-Weekly will return with current issues starting August 2021.

Have a safe and relaxing summer break.

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UVA COVID-19 PREVENTION, DETECTION, AND RESPONSE PLAN

The University is closely monitoring key metrics and has developed a COVID-19 dashboard that will be shared and will track key metrics like the rate of infections and our operational readiness to respond to the virus. We stand ready to alter our operations and plans based on these metrics. We are grateful to all members of our community for their diligence in following the guidelines outlined below. A printable copy of the UVA COVID-19 Prevention, Detection, and Response Plan is available.

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MARK YOUR CALENDAR

Spring 2021

May 7-15: Exams
May 9 and 12: Reading Days
May 21-23: 2021 Finals Weekend
May 28-30: 2020 Finals Weekend

Add/Drop/Withdrawal Deadlines

Summer 2021

May 24 - June 16: Session I (Exam: Thursday, June 17)
June 21 - July 16: Session II (Exam: Saturday, July 17)
June 19 – August 12: Session III (Exam: Friday, August 13)
June 21 – August 12: Eight-week session (Exam: Friday, August 13)

Add/Drop Deadlines: contact Summer Session

Monday, May 31- Memorial Day Holiday; No Classes
Monday, July 5 - Independence Day Holiday; No Classes

Fall 2021

Fall Arrival & Orientation: TBD

August 25: Courses Begin

 

Quote of the Week

“Don’t follow the path. Go where there is no path and start a trail.” Ruby Bridges

Quote's Corner

At the tender age of six, Ruby Bridges advanced the cause of civil rights in November 1960 when she became the first African American student to integrate an elementary school in the South. Born on September 8, 1954, Bridges was the oldest of five children for Lucille and Abon Bridges, farmers in Tylertown, Mississippi. When Ruby was two years old, her parents moved their family to New Orleans, Louisiana in search of better work opportunities. Ruby’s birth year coincided with the US Supreme Court’s landmark ruling in Brown v. the Board of Education of Topeka Kansas, which ended racial segregation in public schools. Nonetheless, southern states continued to resist integration, and in 1959, Ruby attended a segregated New Orleans kindergarten. A year later, however, a federal court ordered Louisiana to desegregate. The school district created entrance exams for African American students to see whether they could compete academically at the all-white school. Ruby passed the exam. Her father resisted, fearing for his daughter’s safety; her mother, however, wanted Ruby to have the educational opportunities that her parents had been denied. Meanwhile, the school district delayed her admittance until November 14. Ruby and her mother were escorted by four federal marshals to the school every day that year. She walked past crowds screaming vicious slurs at her. She spent her first day in the principal’s office due to the chaos created as angry white parents pulled their children from school. Barbara Henry, a white Boston native, was the only teacher willing to accept Ruby, and all year, she was a class of one. Ruby ate lunch alone and sometimes played with her teacher at recess, but she never missed a day of school that year. The Bridges family suffered for their courage: Abon lost his job, and grocery stores refused to sell to Lucille. Her share-cropping grandparents were evicted from the farm where they had lived for a quarter-century. In 1964, artist Norman Rockwell celebrated her courage with a painting of that first day entitled, “The Problem We All Live With.” Ruby graduated from a desegregated high school, became a travel agent, married and had four sons. She was reunited with her first teacher, Henry, in the mid-1990s, and for a time the pair did speaking engagements together. Ruby later wrote about her early experiences in two books and received the Carter G. Woodson Book Award. A lifelong activist for racial equality, in 1999, Ruby established The Ruby Bridges Foundation to promote tolerance and create change through education. In 2000, she was made an honorary deputy marshal in a ceremony in Washington, DC.

Opportunites with Deadlines

Hoos Internship Accelerator
Application Deadline: Sunday, May 16th

Announcement: Hoos Internship Accelerator (HIA) is a new summer internship program supported by the UVA Career Center and UVA Alumni Association that will connect 500 rising third- and fourth-year students with virtual, skill-building, 4–8 week internship experiences. Internships are typically 20–25 hours per week. Interns will have access to a wealth of professional support coordinated by the University, including online mentorship; one-on-one career advising, and pre-and post-internship training. For more information: Contact Name: Aubrey O'Hara

Econ Majors Diversity Cohort Focus Group

Coordinated by the Economics Career Office Student Advisory Board (ECOSAB) The ECOSAB is seeking Black, Latinx, APIDA, and FGLI students, who are currently Economics majors or planning to declare, to share their feedback and experiences with the Economics Department in a focus group. You’ll contribute to developing a diversity cohort aimed to increase diversity within the major and support Economics students from underrepresented groups to be successful now and beyond graduation! Contact: Dazzelle Bagtas to express interest or any questions.

The New Innovative UVA Medical Academic Enrichment Program
Virtual SMLP 2021 Applications are OPEN

The University of Virginia School of Medicine (UVASOM) is conducting a new virtual innovative medical academic enrichment program, the Summer Medical Leadership Program (SMLP). The number one goal of SMLP is to expose the participants to the “real world of medicine” to prepare them not only for admission to medical school but to assume future leadership positions in medicine/biomedical field. SMLP is an intensive six-week residential summer medical academic enrichment program for30 undergraduate students from underrepresented groups and disadvantaged backgrounds who are interested in pursuing careers in medicine, and chosen from a nationwide pool of applicants. SMLP is under the direction of Dr. Taison Bell. Dr. Bell is the Assistant Professor of Medicine in the divisions of Infectious Disease and Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine as well as the Assistant Director of the Medical ICU. Apply Here!

Morven Kitchen Garden (MKG) Spring Internship
MKG is hiring Spring Semester Interns.  MKG is a one-acre garden where University of Virginia students learnlead, and connect through growing food.  MKG provides an opportunity and place for students to directly participate in all aspects of sustainable food production. The internship details and application are available here. Visit our website to learn more about the garden and ways to get involved. Questions about the internship? Please contact Stephanie Meyers, scm6x@virginia.edu

Ridley Scholarship Fund Awards Available to Non-Ridley Students Available
Ridley scholarships that extend beyond current scholars: https://aig.alumni.virginia.edu/ridley/about/ridley-scholarships/

Truist Ridley Leadership and Financial Education Academy (Set to Begin in January 2022)
Partnering with the BB&T Leadership Institute in Greensboro, North Carolina, and the UVA Career Center, the academy program will feature participation by Truist executives in teaching students about financial services, asset management and advisory services, technology, data sciences and operating careers, as well as participation by partners from consulting, legal, financial planning, accountancy and related fields.  It will also feature leadership and well-being course instruction from the Leadership Institute’s award-winning faculty. The initial funding will provide for two summer’s worth of 3-to-4 cohorts of 15 students to participate. Over a two-year period, the pilot program will support up to 120 African-American students at UVA. This will provide these rising second year students with an early experience of Truist’s commitment to teammates and diversity and inclusion, and a valuable addition to career resumes.  For Truist, it provides a remarkable opportunity to connect with high-quality cohorts of students in an authentic setting and create brand awareness of the opportunities Truist is committed to providing. 

 

 

 

This Week in Black History

Did you know? Sidney L. Poitier KBE (born February 20, 1927) is a Bahamian-American retired actor, film director, activist, and ambassador. In 1964, Poitier won the Academy Award for Best Actor becoming the first black male and Bahamian actor to win that award. He is one of the last surviving stars from the Golden Age of Hollywood cinema, and the oldest living and earliest surviving Best Actor Academy Award winner. From 1997 to 2007, he served as the Bahamian Ambassador to Japan.  His entire family lived in the Bahamas, then still a British colony, but Poitier was born unexpectedly in Miami while they were visiting for the weekend, which automatically granted him American citizenship. He grew up in the Bahamas, but moved back to Miami aged 15 and to New York when he was 16. He joined the North American Negro Theatre, landing his breakthrough film role as a high school student in the film Blackboard Jungle (1955). In 1958, Poitier starred with Tony Curtis as chained-together escaped convicts in The Defiant Ones, which received nine Academy Award nominations. Poitier received a nomination for Best Actor, he was the first black actor to be nominated. He was also nomination for a BAFTA, which he won. In 1964, he won the Academy Award and the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor for Lilies of the Field (1963). Poitier also received acclaim for Porgy and Bess (1959), A Raisin in the Sun (1961) and A Patch of Blue (1965). He continued to break ground in three successful 1967 films which dealt with issues of race and race relations: To Sir, with Love; Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, and In the Heat of the Night. He was the top box-office star of the year. He received Golden Globe Award and British Academy Film Award nominations for his performance in the latter film. Poitier continued acting in film and television as well as directing various comedy films including Stir Crazy (1980) starring Richard Pryor and Gene Wilder, among other films. Poitier was made an honorary Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire (KBE) by Queen Elizabeth II in 1974. In 1995, Poitier received the Kennedy Center Honor. In 2009, Poitier was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the United States' highest civilian honor. In 2016, he was awarded the BAFTA Fellowship for outstanding lifetime achievement in film. In 1999, Poitier was ranked 22nd among the male actors on the "100 Years...100 Stars" list by the American Film Institute. He is also the recipient of a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album. In 1982, he received the Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award and in 2000, he received the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award. In 2002, Poitier was chosen to receive an Academy Honorary Award, in recognition of his "remarkable accomplishments as an artist and as a human being." Poitier's impressive list of awards includes 2 Academy Award nominations, 10 Golden Globes nominations, 2 Primetime Emmy Awards nominations, 6 BAFTA nominations, 8 Laurel nominations and one Screen Actors Guild Awards nominations.

OAAA Announcements & Services

OAAA Announcements & Services – Spring 2021

OAAA Virtual Office Hours

Monday with Dean Bassett        
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm –
Zoom Meeting - Passcode: 984107

Tuesday with TBA
11:30 am – 1:00 pm – Zoom Meeting - Passcode: 621470

Wednesday with Dean Thomas                                           
3:30 pm – 5:00 pm – Zoom Meeting - Passcode: 412435

Thursday with Dean Bassett
10:30 – 12:00 pm – Zoom Meeting - Passcode: 536215

Friday with TBA (Alternating)
9:30 am – 11:00 am –
Zoom Meeting - Passcode: 763369

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OAAA Tutoring for Spring 2021 Contact: Dean Thomas for more information

OAAA tutors meeting dates & times via Zoom:

Calculus & Statistics Tutoring
Every Monday – 12:00 pm-2:30 pm – Travis Elliott @ Zoom Room
Every Thursday – 2:00 pm-4:30 pm – Travis Elliott @ Zoom Room

Organic Chemistry Tutoring
Every Monday6:30 pm-8:30 pmSarah Weisflog @ Zoom Room

Chemistry Tutoring
Every Tuesday5:00 pm-7:00 pmYvette Gamor @ Zoom Room

Biology Tutoring
Every Thursday – 6:00 pm–8:00 pmMihret Niguse @ Zoom Room

Biology Tutoring
Every Sunday – 6:00 pm–8:00 pmHeather Poyner @ Zoom Room

 

 

Upcoming Events

Live Meditation with Roshi Joan Halifax
Wednesday, May 12 – 11:00 am-11:30 am –
Register

We are pleased to announce that Roshi Joan Halifax— renowned Buddhist teacher, Zen priest, anthropologist, and pioneer in the field of end-of-life care—will join us live on May 12 for an extended 30-minute edition of Virtual Meditation on the Lawn. Roshi Joan will lead a 15-minute meditation followed by an audience Q&A period. Free and open to the public. For more information Contact: Contemplative Sciences Center

Fellowships Series
Every Monday –
4:00 pm – Full schedule available here

There are introductory sessions each month, which are great for first and second year students and a good first touchpoint with our office for anyone else. There are a number of sessions dedicated to those fellowships that have a deadline in the fall. It is important that students start considering those opportunities early so that they can take advantage of our summer advising programming and be well prepared. We encourage third and fourth years, graduate and professional students, and area alumni to attend those sessions on the UK Awards, Foreign Service Awards, Asia Awards, NSF GRFP, and the Fulbright US Student Award this spring. Second years will want to note the Udall, Gilman, Truman, and STEM Awards (includes Goldwater) sessions.